What made the things easier is the deliverance of a calming drug before even the sedative calmed her down a lot, so she was at peace, rather than terrified during the final procedure.

I've had cats as companions for most of my life. And before becoming aware of home euthanasia, I always found myself at the moment when I knew there was no choice but to head down to the vet for the last time. The problem with clinical euthanasia is that as soon as the cat gets a whiff of the office, all the negative memories of shots, probes and being handled by strangers come flooding back. Instead of being relaxed, and comforted, the kitty is filled with dread and terror of what's to come. No vet experienve is ever pleasant.

All the tension is removed with the at-home experience. Soothing words and familiar surroundings...accustomed smells, gentle stroking. The trusting kitty looks into my eyes, knowing that her best interest are being looked after...all is well...the pain will soon be gone. The warmth of the sedative envelops her and it's okay to nap here on my lap, just like so many times in  the past, purring and relaxing. A little twinge on her foreleg...dimness begins...my comforting voice is the last thing she hears as she slips away, loved to the end. 

My Lady Bug was always exceptionally skittish and excitable.  The trusting kitty looks into my's eyes, knowing that her best interest are being looked after...all is well...the pain will soon be gone. My comforting voice is the last thing she hears as she slips away, loved to the end. I would like to dedicate this song, "Bright Eyes," to Lady Bug. 

This was definitely written "from the heart" after letting Lady Bug go, and hopefully expresses what many "parents" feel when it comes time for that inevitable decision. 

As to "the Bug" and her life: my ending up with her was pure chance. There was a feral mom and her kittens in the area, and my wife was determined to do a rescue/capture. Lady was not quite as quick as her siblings, and ended up being the only one we could get. Mom became more secretive after our raid and kept her brood at a distance.

Lady howled piteously for the first few days, but little by little warmed up to me. I already had a neutered male, Boomer the Barbarian, who was getting on in years, and he was forced to yield his "top dog" position in the household, to this feisty little calico. They chased each other endlessly, up and down hallways and over the furniture. Lady was usually the instigator and went after Boomer when he would have much rather have been snoozing in the sun. After Boomer died (I wish I had known about Home Pet Euthanasia then) Lady was the undisputed queen of the household. At least until I adopted two sister kitties from a litter next door. As they grew and eventually took over, Lady relinquished her crown and retreated into her retirement, not in the least interested in being teased by these two young siblings. It was a sad day when I noticed a swelling on the side of her face after she turned 15. The vet told me the signs to watch for, once surgery was set aside, due to her advancing age. A couple of months later, with the Rainbow Bridge coming into view on the horizon, I turned to Dr. Annie's service.

Steve Lee
La Habra

Friends who remember Lady Bug...

You will always be remembered with love!
We'll meet at the Rainbow Bridge one day
Thinking of you... ❤️❤️❤️